Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Relocating to Puerto Rico

If you are thinking of relocating to Puerto Rico or even purchasing a vacation home, you will have probably found that information is limited (or hard to find) on the internet. If you are moving here on business then you are probably in luck as your company will help in the relocation process. But if you are making the move on your own it can be quite daunting. So here are a few resources that I hope will be useful.

Finding a Job

Monster (www.monster.com)
ClasificadosOnline – Jobs (www.clasificadosonline.com/Jobs.asp)
America’s Job bank (www.ajb.org/)

Finding a Home

House prices are expensive in Puerto Rico (in my opinion). Expect to pay upwards of $200,000 for a small walkup / apartment (this would be in somewhere like Guaynabo). The further away from San Juan, the more you will get for your money. House in a good area upwards of $300,000.

ClasificadosOnline (www.clasificadosonline.com/RealEstate.asp)
Point2Homes (www.homes.point2.com/US/Puerto-Rico-Real-Estate.aspx)
CompraoAlquila (www.compraoalquila.com/bienes-raices-venta.php)
Realestate.com.pr (www.realestate.com.pr/)

Moving Household Goods

Most major moving companies will give you a quote for moving your goods to Puerto Rico. It will take approximately 1-2 weeks for your shipment to arrive (from the east coast of the United States).
One thing to remember; you will have to pay an import tax on your household goods. This import tax also applies to any vehicles that you bring to Puerto Rico.
The Departamento de Hacienda’s website (www.hacienda.gobierno.pr) gives information on taxes etc. and also has a page that will give you an estimate of the amount of tax you will have to pay on any vehicle that you bring here.
You will not be able to take your goods from the port until all taxes are paid.

One last point. Depending on where you will be working, you may need to obtain certificates from the various Puerto Rican government offices (proof of no debt, no taxes due etc.). This process can be very time consuming, with a lot of time waiting in the various government buildings. Give yourself a couple of days if you need to obtain this information.

Hopefully the above information will give you a starting point for finding out more about moving here to Puerto Rico

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Comments

  1. Hello,

    I found your website while I was doing some research on the internet. I have been in PR for the past 10 years and my profession is helping people that are relocating or already relocated adjust to the Island. Possibily your readers that want information may want to know that there is a North American Psychotherapist on the Island that actually takes appointments “on-time” as well as I provide cultural training seminars to corporate expats when relocating for the entire family.

    I am always looking for different resources to give my clients and I like your site and comments.

    Please feel free to send anyone that you think may benefit from my services my way.

    Best to you!

    Regards,

    Lynn Stravecky
    Psychotherapist & Certified Intercultural Trainer

    • Hi Lynn, I’m hoping you’ll still read this. I am a child therapist and I’m considering relocation to PR. Are there jobs for child therapists? Also, my partner is a school administrator. He doesn’t speak spanish yet, but wants to learn. Would we be able to be “out” in PR? We are also hoping to have a child before we move or while we live there. What do you think? i tried to email you, but I can’t get the email address from your profile.

      • Hello,

        Just saw this… as I have not gone on this site all year. Don’t know if you are still interested in coming to PR and have your concerns answered. Please feel free to contact me direcdtly (lynns@onelinkpr.net) or go to my web site: http://www.journeyandbeyond.com for my info.

        Best to you and I look forward to hearing from you.

        Lynn

  2. Chris Cromeans says:

    I’ve enjoyed reading you site, and have found it helpful. I am a teacher in Texas and have considered seeking employment in Puerto Rico. How hard is it to get teaching jobs in PR (around the San Juan area) and how does the pay compare to the states?

    • Sorry I have not been on this site and they do not seem to advise you when their is a post. Not sure how this works… But, please feel free to contact me at (787) 365-8348 if I can help.

      Finding employment in PR can be a challenge if you do not know the language. But, depending on your field, you may have good luck. The private schools pay better and seem to always be looking for teachers. Pay is much less here than in the US though.

      Good luck!

      Lynn Stravecky
      www. journeyandbeyond.com

  3. Hello Chris,

    Please feel free to drop me an email and I will try to help you with your questions.

    Not sure on the pay (although the pay scale here has been known to be lower than in the US. There are a number of Private schools on the Island that may need teachers (not sure if you are billingual). St. Johns, Robinson, Baldwin are a few that are English speaking in the Metro area.

    Hope that helps.

    Good Luck!

  4. Hello. I am an african american woman looking to relocate to Puerto Rico throuh a reassignment with the post office. I am excited and nervous all at the same time. I wanted to know what are some nice/affordable places to live in San Juan, Carolina, Canovana or Ceiba. These are the postal locations that have reassignment opportunities available. I would like to rent a 2 bedroom apartment in a family oriented area. I do not yet speak spanish but look forward to learning. Thanks

  5. Please contact me if I can be of service. (787) 365-8348

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